Important Role of former Nazis in Eastern Germany." 

November 21, 1950
Central Files Decimal Number 762B.00

U.S. Civilian Advisory Effort in Vietnam: U.S. Operations Mission, 1950-1954

Summary

Correspondence and memoranda, telegrams and dispatches, speeches, legislation, and more document the U.S. agencies established to intervene in Vietnam, the country U.S. foreign policy deemed a lynchpin in the free world's fight against communism

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Date Range: 1950-1954
Content: 15,742 pages
Source Library: U.S. National Archives

Description

The collapse of the Chinese Nationalist government in 1949 sharpened American apprehensions over communist expansion in the Far East and hastened U.S. measures to counter the threat posed by Mao’s China. The U.S. sought to create and employ policy instruments similar to those it was bringing into play against the Soviets in Europe: collective security organizations, economic aid, and military assistance.  The U.S. decided that the impetus for collective security in Asia should come from the Asians, but by late 1949, it also recognized that action was necessary in Indochina. Thus, in the closing months of 1949, the course of U.S. policy was set to block further communist expansion in Asia through collective security if the Asians were forthcoming and collaboration with major European allies and commonwealth nations, if possible.  The result: the Korean War of 1950-1953, the forming of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization of 1954, and the progressively deepening U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

U.S. Civilian Advisory Effort in Vietnam: U.S. Operations Mission, 1950-1954 consists of unique records of U.S. agencies established to intervene in Vietnam, the country U.S. foreign policy deemed a lynchpin in the free world’s fight against communism. The Subject Files from the Office of the Director, U.S. Operations Missions, document the myriad concerns and rationales that went into the control and direction of U.S. economic and technical assistance programs, as well as the coordination of mutual security activities, with respect to Vietnam.

Primary sources include:

  • Correspondence and memoranda
  • Telegrams and dispatches
  • Speeches
  • Legislation
  • Reports and surveys
  • Texts of parliamentary debates
  • Legal documents
  • Administrative orders
  • Memoranda of conversations
  • Analyses

This collection provides provides a wealth of information necessary for research in Asian and Southeast Asian studies, diplomatic and military history, global studies, post-colonial studies, and political science.

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