Important Role of former Nazis in Eastern Germany." 

November 21, 1950
Central Files Decimal Number 762B.00

Northern Ireland: A Divided Community, 1921–1972

Summary

Northern Ireland: A Divided Community, 1921–1972 is a fully searchable collection of the complete Cabinet Conclusion files from the Stormont Administration in Belfast, from its start following the Government of Ireland Act of 1920 to the reintroduction of direct rule from Westminster by British Prime Minister Edward Heath in 1972.  The Cabinet Conclusion files document every debate and transaction for the entire period and have been described as the best continuous record of government activity and decisionmaking in the world. Separate files exist for each Cabinet Meeting and include minutes and memoranda. 

Date Range: 1921–1972
Source Library: The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, the national archives for Northern Ireland located in Belfast

Description

This archive presents the Cabinet Conclusion files that document all the debates and transactions for the duration of the Stormont administration, the devolved government of Northern Ireland, 1921–1972. These documents are key to any study of the turbulent history of Britain and Ireland during much of the 20th century and cover such topics as:

  • Prevention of incitement to religious hatred
  • Road spiking
  • Dock strikes
  • Routing of Orange Day parades
  • Role of the Ulster Defence Force
  • Policing
  • Prisons
  • Army occupation of factories

The documents in Northern Ireland: A Divided Community 1921-1972 are fully searchable and have been described as the best continuous record of government activity and decision making in the world.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, download a Product Fact Sheet [pdf, 280 KB]

Advisory Board

Northern Ireland: A Divided Community, 1921–1972 was developed under the close guidance of general editors.

Dr. Senia Paseta
St Hugh’s College, Oxford

Dr. Marc Mulholland
St Catherine’s College, Oxford

Review

"A terrific resource for scholars working on modern Irish history. There is a growing interest in scholarly analysis of this period, reflected in books and university courses."
— Professor Roy Foster, Professor of Irish History, University of Oxford

“The Cabinet Minutes and Memoranda series at PRONI have long been the most heavily used public records. This collaboration with Gale brings historians and students of politics a tremendous new opportunity to conduct detailed research from their own desks, and will we hope, lead to even greater global use and awareness of this unique archive.”
— Dr. Gerry Slater, Chief Executive of The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, on the release of Northern Ireland: A Divided Community, 1921–1972

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