Important Role of former Nazis in Eastern Germany." 

November 21, 1950
Central Files Decimal Number 762B.00

Czechoslovakia from Liberation to Communist State, 1945-63: Records of the U.S. State Department Classified Files

Summary
Track two decades of political turmoil and social upheaval that grew from the establishment of a Stalinist state

An intuitive platform makes it all cross-searchable by subject or collection.

Date Range: 1945-1963
Content: 52,359 pages
Source Library: U.S. National Archives

Description
For scholars of European and global studies, economics, human rights and international government, Czechoslovakia from Liberation to Communist State uncovers rich data on crucial topics, from political parties to public health. Researchers can track the widespread effects of a Stalinist state, while librarians can offer rare access to formerly classified documents, ready to be searched and downloaded with digital ease.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, download a Product Fact Sheet [pdf, 1.05 MB]

From the shambles of defeat and occupation in World War II, Czechoslovakia underwent a transformation, which included maintaining a public image of political pluralism through the existence of the National Front. And while the economy remained more advanced than those of its Eastern European neighbors, it grew increasingly vulnerable. With the support the Czech Communist Party, the nation became a member of the Warsaw Pact and strong proponent of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance.

Czechoslovakia from Liberation to Communist State documents the creation of the Third Republic first as a compromise between Czechoslovak Republic leaders and the Czech Communist Party (KSC) and later by Communist takeover.

Despite the efforts of nationalist leaders Eduard Benes and Jan Masaryk to re-establish liberal, democratic pre-war principles and institutions, KSC expanded its influence and in 1948 seized all power in the nation, ushering in two decades of political, economic and cultural malaise.

Documents include:

  • Special reports on political and military affairs
  • Studies and statistics on socioeconomic matters
  • Interviews and minutes of meetings with foreign government officials
  • Court proceedings and other legal documents
  • Full texts of important letters, instructions, and cables sent and received by U.S. diplomatic personnel
  • Voluminous reports and translations from foreign journals and newspapers
  • Countless translations of high-level foreign government documents, including speeches, memoranda, official reports, and transcripts of political meetings and assemblies
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